Cast on in the middle of a row

Three ways to add stitches in the middle of a row

In this post, I’ve compared three ways to add more stitches to a row in the middle of a project. This can be done at the start, the end, or in the middle of a row.

Whether a cast on method is used to add stitches to the end or the beginning of a row is determined by the direction the stitches in added in.

Adding stitches at the end or beginning of a row

If the stitches are added in the same direction as we knit, the new stitches are added at the end of a row.

Cast on methods that add stitches in the opposite direction adds stitches at the beginning of a row.

It doesn’t really matter if you add the stitches at the end or at the beginning of the row when knitting back and forth as it will be the same thing when you turn your work over! Just check that you add the stitches at the right side 🙂

Method 1: Knitted Cast on

Knitted cast on is easy to perform and works both when casting on for a new project and when adding stitches in the middle of a project.

You can use it for adding stitches at the beginning of a row, at the edge of your work. But, you can also use it to add new stitches in the middle of a row.


The knitted cast on can be a bit on the loose side, but it’s firmer than the next on the list, the Back loop cast on.

Use the knitted cast on when…

  • … casting on for a new project
  • … adding stitches at the beginning of a row
  • … adding sittches in the middle of a row

Want to know more and learn how to do the knitted cast on?
––> Read my tutorial here
––> Watch my Youtube video here

Method 2. Backward loop cast on

Backward loop cast on can be used to cast on for a new project, as well as adding stitches at the end of a row and in the middle of a row.

Perfect for seamed edges!

This way of adding stitches to a work in progress makes a very loose edge but doesn’t add any bulk to the fabric.

These two characteristics make backward loop cast on very good to use when you’re are going to seam the edge. It’s easy to see where to sew and no extra bulk is added to the seam.

Backward loop for unseamed edges

If you’re going for a very loose edge for an airy scarf or summer top this cast on may work. I would swatch it carefully thou to see how the result will look and act.

Adding stitches to a row

Backward loop cast on is done in the working direction, which means it can be used to add stitches to the end of a row.

To add stitches in the middle of a row is also an option with this method. Just be aware that the edge created is unstable. This means that buttonholes, for example, may not hold their shape if done with the backward loop cast on.

Use the backward loop cast on when…

  • … the cast on edge are going to be seamed
  • … casting on for a project where a loose edge is wanted
  • … adding stitches at the end of a row
  • … adding stitches in the middle of a row

Want to know more and learn the backward loop cast on?
––> Read my tutorial here
––> Watch my Youtube video here

Method 3: Chinese Waitress Cast on

This method uses one knitting needle and a crochet hook and takes a little more practice, but it’s also way prettier than the others!

The Chinese waitress cast on is stretchy and looks great on both sides which can be important for some projects.

This method can be used to start a project or to add stitches at the beginning of a row.

Use Chinese Waitress cast on when…

  • … casting on for a project whit a visible edge
  • … casting on for a reversible project
  • … adding more stitches at the beginning of a row
  • … adding more stitches in the middle of a row

Want to know more and learn the Chinese waitress cast on?
––> Read my tutorial here
––> Watch my Youtube video here

More to read:
––> Provisional cast ons
––> How to knit a cute scalloped cast on edge
––> Best journals for knitters